Spilt Milk Yoga is the book I wish I’d had when I became a moth­er.

I want the best for my chil­dren, like all moth­ers around the world. And often a lit­tle thing will get in the way of our day togeth­er being the joy­ful won­der that life is, and often that thing is in me. In reac­tion to the spilt milk of my moth­er­ing day I react; I flare up, feel hurt, angry, lone­ly, anx­ious. The spilt milk will just hap­pen, but I want to grow my con­scious response to it, and become more the per­son I want to be. That’s the yoga part, my inner work. It’s impor­tant but it’s not easy.

If you are a moth­er yearn­ing for greater free­dom to love your life while you live it, to be present to your joy and your chil­dren, then Spilt Milk Yoga is for you. If you want to con­nect to your own inner wis­dom, (which is in there, no mat­ter how far away from it you may feel) and thrive, not just sur­vive moth­er­hood, then Spilt Milk Yoga will guide you toward grow­ing your capac­i­ty for self-knowledge, joy and pur­pose, not in spite of moth­er­hood but because of it.

OWN IT — Applying the Practice of Compassionate Learning

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OWN IT – Apply­ing Com­pas­sion I’m try­ing to do right, but I’ve done it wrong. I kid you not, I just caught myself writ­ing this text to my 16 year old; “My point is I wasn’t ONLY mad at you. I showed up with your stuff. You asked me how I was and I let you know that it does break up my day hav­ing to bring you warm stuff…” STOP! What am I doing? I am jus­ti­fy­ing, rant­i­ng, feel­ing right­eous indig­na­tion. I have anoth­er go. I try to apol­o­gise and repair but it gets away on me. “I apol­o­gise for being…

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Growing Intention

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Spilt Milk Yoga isn’t about the age of your chil­dren. It’s about YOU as a human in progress. I wrote Spilt Milk Yoga because I need­ed a way to give shape and a sense of progress to the mush of reac­tions, prac­tices and aspi­ra­tions going on in my head. I have used this Inten­tion chap­ter numer­ous times regard­less of my children’s ages and for dif­fer­ent sit­u­a­tions, and my answers are always dif­fer­ent. I wrote the guts of this chap­ter when my chil­dren were 3 and 6. Now they are 13 and 16 but I am still prac­tic­ing Inten­tion. I guess that’s…

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THE INVISIBLE PROBLEM – Part 3. Finding Our Value and Staying Sane Today

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Cur­rent­ly moth­er­hood exists out­side the sphere of net worth mea­sure­ments, except as a cost in sick days and mater­ni­ty leave from paid work, or as a career-stopper for all those degrees that go “nowhere”. Although in the big­ger pic­ture moth­er­hood could be seen as adding val­ue, as a solu­tion to nation­al ills, health expen­di­ture and per­son­al and soci­etal heartache, I couldn’t wait for cen­tral gov­ern­ment to wake up to this before I took action, my kids would have left home by then. If I couldn’t change gov­ern­ment approach to social pol­i­cy I fig­ured I would have to change my approach to…

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THE INVISIBLE PROBLEM – Part 2. Mothers Valued as the Foundation of Social Health

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Why is it that moth­er­hood is an anom­aly in our social struc­ture? Why is moth­er­hood such an under-mined, invis­i­ble asset and not treat­ed like the gold­en resource that it is? Because it’s val­ue is immea­sur­able, not able to be mon­e­tized? Does it only count if it can be boiled down to its net worth? Per­haps moth­er­hood is out­side the box because it was there before the box was built, and the blokes that built the box just took it for grant­ed. Moth­er­ing is like the sun­set; impor­tant, always been there, we need it, we love it, it’ll keep hap­pen­ing regard­less. But…

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THE INVISIBLE PROBLEM – Part 1. Motherhood Undervalued

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…there are invis­i­ble prob­lems all around us, ones we can solve. But first we need to see them, to feel them.” —TONY FADDELL, CEONEST Many con­tem­po­rary moth­ers, like me, have had spe­cial­ized edu­ca­tions, suc­cess­ful careers, incomes and aspi­ra­tions when they become moth­ers. We’re achiev­ers, we want to be our best at what­ev­er we do. Moth­er­hood runs counter to so much of the suc­cess indi­ca­tors our soci­ety mea­sures by. Whether we return to paid work and jug­gle work hours along­side the demands of fam­i­ly life, or work at home full-time rais­ing our chil­dren, our lives sud­den­ly have a dif­fer­ent pri­or­i­ty and shape.…

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